May 9

APPLICATION TO PERMIT THE DEMOLITION OF THE UGANDAN HIGH COMMISSION, 231 COBOURG STREET

Voted against; approved at Council

The demolition of 231 Cobourg is a loss to the contributing heritage stock of the neighbourhood. There is an ongoing debate amongst professionals as to what the value of the building actually is (given its current state). However, that is not something that the neighbourhood agrees with. The proper investments were not made over the years by the embassy to address the structural changes that appeared on the foundation and building which brings us to the current state of disrepair. The efforts of the Sandy Hill community to build the Prime Minister’s row initiative builds on connecting the lived experiences of the Prime Ministers who lived in our community.

The demolition was approved so the only good news is that the High Commission’s architect will work with the City to ensure the replacement building’s design is in line with heritage district policies and that it echoes the memory of the current building.

The latest update is that Action Sandy Hill has appealed the decision, and since then the Ambassador has demonstrated willingness to look at options to save the heritage designated property.

 

TEMPORARY ROAD CLOSURE MODIFICATION – EMOND STREET

Voted in favour; approved at Council

Emond Street is a very unique street in our neighbourhood since it has a strip club on one end and a children’s park on the other and its full length is one block. Residents had many concerns about the speeding, dangerous driving, solicitation, and drug activity that was occurring on their street. In 2016, we temporally closed the street using two planters and a chain. This led to an improvement in safety for the residents; however, they noticed the chain was very often broken likely due to (private contractor) snow maintenance and cars that were choosing to ignore the closure. For this reason, we are adding a third planter in the middle and removing the need for this chain altogether. A much needed improvement to reduce impact of the commercial uses on the residential street.

EMERGENCY SHELTER ROOMS AGREEMENT WITH A PRIVATE HOTELS AND MOTELS

Voted in favour; approved at Council

This report stems from a motion I brought forward and it served to gather monthly data regarding the use of hotels as shelters. I have recommended that the City be more aware of these statistics and equitably disperse this usage throughout the City instead of predominately in ward 12 as they are now.

 

2018 OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGET – Q1 STATUS REPORT

Voted in favour; approved at Council

City Council approved $1.8 million in additional spending to strengthen care of residents at the City of Ottawa’s four long-term care homes.

Council approved hiring 35 additional support staff with an immediate $800,000 in funding. Council also approved $1 million in capital funding to upgrade equipment such as beds and lifts, and to implement a new electronic resident-care information system.

 

May 23

ZONING AMENDMENT: LIVE MUSIC AND PERFORMANCE VENUES

Voted in favour; approved at Council

This report approved a zoning amendment to increase opportunities for live music and performance venues, in line with the recently adopted Ottawa Music Strategy. Music venues happen across a wide range of locations and are critical to a city’s cultural scene. With this amendment, live music and theatre will be permitted uses in any place of worship or assembly across the city, as well as permitted accessory uses in commercial stores and restaurants.

 

PLASTIC WASTE

Voted in favour; approved at Council

Staff have been tasked with investigating best practices and programs adopted by other municipalities with regard to single use plastic items.

 

ZONING BY-LAW AMENDMENT – 305 WILBROD STREET

Voted in favour; approved at Council

A new physiotherapy clinic will be permitted on the ground floor of the existing building at 305 Wilbrod.

 

June 13

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN FOR THE OTTAWA PUBLIC LIBRARY AND LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES CANADA JOINT FACILITY

Voted in favour; approved at Council

City Council approved the implementation plan for building the new Central Library. The City will build the library as a joint facility with Library and Archives Canada at 557 Wellington Street, opening in 2024. The design process will start in early 2019 and will include public consultations on the design and function of the library.

 

2017 INVESTMENTS, ENDOWMENT FUND AND OTHER TREASURY ACTIVITIES REPORT

Voted in favour; approved at Council

The Ottawa 2017 Final Report summarized the year’s festivities and financial state. Ottawa welcomed more than 11 million visitors in 2017, 8.8 per cent more than in 2016. Celebrations Ottawa Inc. delivered more than 100 events and activities, including the Picnic on the Bridge, Mìwàte at Chaudière Falls, Red Bull Crashed Ice and La Machine. Ottawa 2017 was a true success.

 

R4 AND MULTI-UNIT RESIDENTIAL ZONING REVIEW

Voted in favour; approved at Council

This report approved a zoning amendment that will limit the number of bedrooms in multi-unit buildings. We worked hard with the community to accomplish this.

The amendment introduces a limit of four bedrooms per dwelling unit within a multi-unit building. In detached dwellings, the maximum would be eight bedrooms. Special regulation for new residential buildings in Sandy Hill to provide a room for garbage and recyclables indoors. Additional measures are continuing to be reviewed and will be considered as part of the second phase of the R4 review; until then, the Interim Control ByLaw remains in place.

 

DESIGNATION OF THE OTTAWA ROWING CLUB BOATHOUSE, 8-10 LADY GREY DRIVE, UNDER PART IV OF THE ONTARIO HERITAGE ACT

Voted in favour; approved at Council

The Ottawa Rowing Club now has a heritage designation. The two-bay boathouse with clubhouse space above was built around 1898 on the shore of the Ottawa River in Lowertown East. The design is a rare example of late 19th century recreational architecture and has historical value for its association with competitive rowing and several significant individuals in Ottawa’s history. We worked closely with the Ottawa Rowing Club, the Community and the City to bring forward this important designation.

 

OTTAWA COMMUNITY HOUSING CORPORATION (OCHC) ANNUAL REPORT AND ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE SHAREHOLDER

Voted in favour; approved at Council

Council received the annual report of Ottawa Community Housing Corporation. This report contained the signed audited Financial Statements and appointed Dan Doré, Claude Lloyd, and Rebecca Hickey as members of our Board of Directors.

 

June 27 

ROOMING HOUSE LICENSING BY-LAW REVIEW

Voted in favour; approved at Council

This report further clarifies the definition of a rooming house. I added the following direction to staff: 

That Staff be directed to review as part of the license work the need for: 1. restrictions (limits per ward or separation distances) 2. a ratio between people and number of washrooms (and showers) 3. the minimum requirement for the size of a bedroom (would be bigger than provincial jails) 4. specific kitchen amenities (working oven, refrigerator, microwave, sink, kitchen table) 5. all licensed rooming house to be required to have private solid waste pick up 6. a mandatory in person site compliance visit by the city on yearly basis prior to renewal.

 

APPLICATION TO ALTER THE CHÂTEAU LAURIER HOTEL, 1 RIDEAU STREET, A PROPERTY DESIGNATED UNDER PART IV OF THE ONTARIO HERITAGE ACT

Voted in favour; approved at Council

This report approved an addition to the Château Laurier, a national historic site. The approval follows two years of public discussion and several iterations of the design.

The developer Larco Investments has proposed a contemporary, seven-storey addition to the rear of the hotel which continues to be controversial. Compared to the initial proposal, the most recent resubmission shows some improvements.

Specifically:  

– The addition of limestone and bronze elements;

– A lowered roof line to better protect the sight lines of the roof of the Château; and

– The addition of a staircase that integrates the upper balcony to the lower balcony for increased pedestrian access on the site.

City planning staff will work with the applicant to add more limestone to the addition’s exterior, make the north façade less uniform, and introduce patterns and geometric proportions drawn from the historic building.

Despite several improvements, we have heard from the community that the proposed addition does not adequately complement the architectural language of the historic Château Laurier. Improvements aside, the shape and structure of the modern building clashes with the original vision for this iconic landmark.

We plan to get the Chateau Laurier design reviewed by the Built Heritage Committee, Planning Committee and Council prior to any final approvals.

 

ENERGY EVOLUTION: OTTAWA’S COMMUNITY ENERGY TRANSITION STRATEGY, PHASE 2 UPDATE

Voted in favour; approved at Council

This report approved funding for eight energy-efficiency projects, including a pilot to install Canada’s first 150-kilowatt fast-charging station for electric vehicles. The $633,000 in funding comes from last year’s Hydro Ottawa dividend surplus and will support a rebate program to replace wood stoves and energy-efficiency upgrades to City facilities. The spending was part of an update highlighting the second phase of Ottawa’s Energy Evolution strategy.

However, we still feel that Energy Evolution does not go far enough in the fight against climate change the City needs to aggressively shift to reduce energy cost and to modernize its strategy to combat GHG emissions and modernize its system to become more modern and lead in energy efficiency.

 

MOTION – PLASTIC WASTE AT SPECIAL EVENTS

Voted in favour; carried at Council

This motion requires staff to consult with festivals about how to integrate recycling as part of these events. Hopefully, this will lead to all Ottawa festivals having recycling and green bin options in the future, and also force the City to lead by example in our parks and facilities.

 

July 11 

ZONING BY-LAW AMENDMENT – 112 NELSON STREET

Voted in favour; approved at Council

This report will bring a new nine-storey apartment building to 112 Nelson. The applicant brought welcome changes to the project following the public comments. We look forward to working through the design details and site plan details with the applicant and the community going forward. We are happy to see 3 bedroom units in their proposal. As staff has come to an agreement with the applicant on affordable units, we want to ensure that the affordability of units is in line with the City’s housing branch financial ranges.

 

ONTARIO’S MAIN STREET REVITALIZATION INITIATIVE

Voted in favour; approved at Council

The City will get $856,000 in provincial funding for main-street enhancements. The money will come from the Government of Ontario’s $26-million Main Street Revitalization Initiative.

The initiative funds public-realm enhancements in main street areas that improve energy efficiency, accessibility, aesthetics and the marketability of small businesses. As a result of this funding, Montreal Road will be getting public information displays (with bus arrival times) in several bus shelters and York St Plaza will be getting a new tourist kiosk.

 

ZONING BY-LAW AMENDMENT – 815 ST. LAURENT BOULEVARD

Voted in favour; approved at Council

The former Rideau High School at 815 St. Laurent Boulevard is to be used as a community hub. Through the City’s Building Better Revitalized Neighbourhoods (BBRN) initiative, the community selected the site as part of the Vanier South-Overbrook Neighbourhood Revitalization Strategy. The 2018 Action Plan for that strategy calls for repurposing the existing building for community gatherings and as a space that could offer residents services and programs, social supports, cultural services, daycare, medical facilities and educational programs. This will be a great use of a now vacant space.

 

August 29

GATEWAY SPEED LIMIT SIGNAGE IN RESIDENTIAL AREAS

Voted in favour; approved at Council

This report approved the use of gateway speed-limit signs, which mark the entrance and exits of areas with lower speed limits. Our first residential zone to be 40 km / hour will be the southern section of Sandy Hill. We look forward to expanding this into Lowertown and Vanier as well.

 

September 12

ZONING BY-LAW AMENDMENT – 541 AND 545 RIDEAU STREET

Voted in favour; approved at Council

A nine-storey mixed-use building and semi-detached dwelling is now permitted at 541 and 545 Rideau Street. The proposed building will have commercial units on the ground floor and 114 residential units above. The existing house at 541 Rideau Street will be removed and rebuilt to face Cobourg Street.

SANDY HILL HERITAGE STUDY PHASE II: DESIGNATION OF THE RUSSELL AVENUE- RANGE ROAD AND THE BESSERER- WURTEMBURG STREET PROPOSED HERITAGE CONSERVATION DISTRICTS

Voted in favour; approved at Council

Sandy Hill is now home to two new heritage conservation districts: the Russell Avenue-Range Road district and the Besserer-Wurtemburg district. Council now has the authority to review and approve new buildings, along with alterations to the 152 existing properties within the districts. This oversight will serve to continue to protect the heritage character of Sandy Hill with a total of 7 districts within the community.

 

September 26

City Council approved relief to residents rebuilding after the recent tornado. Financial relief from fees, including demolition and building permits, is available for applications submitted due to storm damage. This relief is in addition to the property tax cancellation, reduction or refunds for which residents may be eligible. Several Ottawa Community Housing (OCH) buildings were without power during the aftermath of the tornado. As the chair of OCH, I visited many affected properties to help out and witnessed many residents doing the same.

APPOINTMENT TO THE DOWNTOWN RIDEAU BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT AREA

Congratulations to Brian O’Hoski, Cheryl Sinko, Frederic James Eyondi and Graham Rapsey for being appointed to the Downtown Rideau Business Improvement Area Board.

 

WATER UTILITY BILL DEFERRAL PROGRAM FOR LOW INCOME SENIORS AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

Voted in favour; approved at Council

Starting January 1, low-income seniors and low-income persons with disabilities who own their residence will be able to defer their water utility bills. Council approved the new deferral program, with requirements that mirror the deferral program for property taxes. The City estimates it will defer $115,500 in water utility bills each year.

 

October 10

RENOVATION OF ORIGINAL HOUSE AND CONSTRUCTION OF A REAR ADDITION AT 119 YORK STREET, A PROPERTY DESIGNATED UNDER PART V OF THE ONTARIO HERITAGE ACT, WITHIN THE BYWARD MARKET HERITAGE CONSERVATION DISTRICT

Voted in favour; approved at Council

This report will allow the applicant to restore the heritage features of the existing building located at 119 York Street in the Byward Market. While I supported the project overall, I did have concerns about the impacts on the adjacent heritage properties. I believed proper setbacks should be in place to protect the neighbours specifically Cundell Stables on the western facing wall. Privacy and livability of the neighbours is crucial as part of the construction of this addition.

  1. LA River Revitalization Master Plan stipulated twenty major opportunity areas, promising to improve the health of the ecosystem and the value of the river as a regional public amenity. Above is …

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