On Jan. 29, a Francophone’s right to receive daily news in their preferred language became a priority for our City.

Le Droit is Ontario’s only French-language daily newspaper – and like many newspapers in today’s economy, is struggling to stay afloat.

Founded in 1913 as a means to help protect Franco-Ontarians rights, Le Droit has called Ottawa it’s home for 106 years with the newsroom and head office located in the heart of the ByWard Market.  Now, as it reorganizes with five other papers in Groupe Capitales Média to form a co-operative consolidate certain services (and costs) – information technology, advertising and administration it’s future in Ottawa has become uncertain.

Newspapers must change and evolve as the world evolves around them – but one thing remains certain – the need for news and the need for the media’s presence in this city to support our democracy.

News is essential – and more than that – how we as readers want to read the news is just as important.

The Le Droit is the only French news, outside of Quebec – it’s vital to have a newsroom, and jobs here for our francophone community. Currently, 65 jobs could move to Gatineau. Just as it’s important to continue to protect Franco-Ontario rights, remaining in Ottawa is a part of that.

For Francophones, having the opportunity to read city-wide and community news in French is just as important as the news reaching their door, computer screen or phone each day.

I consider it essential the newsroom remains in the National Capital to help protect the jobs of journalists assigned to cover the city of Ottawa and the province of Ontario, as well as those of correspondents based in Eastern Ontario.

Today my colleagues joined me in acknowledging the importance of Le Droit for Ottawa and is encouraging the newspaper to collaborate with the community and the business community to stay on this side of the river – in Ontario.

I am pleased to say council unanimously passed my motion, seconded by Coun. Stephen Blais.